Another Day of Burning at Shaker Village

KDFWR biologist Chrris Grash creates narrow strips of head fires as our initial fire backs toward him. The creation of "blacked out" areas provides additional protection to the fire brakes already in place. By creating strips, you can widen this blackened area safely and more rapidly than would occur with just a backing fire. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources has been working with Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill to improve portions of their property for wildlife.  A large part of that is conversion of Fescue grass pasture to native short-grass prairie habitat.  Fire is an important tool in maintaining and promoting this prairie.  We still had a few additional acres at Shaker Village that needed to be burned before the growing season begins in earnest.  With temperatures in the 70’s, green-up is rapidly beginning and Wednesday would be our last chance to burn.  These are a few pictures from Wednesday’s burn, the last dormant season burn at Shaker Village for this season.

Click on any image to enlarge

 

 

A very young eastern cotton-tailed rabbit in newly burned habitat at Shaker Village. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

Chris Grasch initiates a fire from an ATV. The ATV allows him to cover ground more rapidly than would be possible on foot. A huge benefit in areas like Shaker Village where we are trying to burn large blocks of land. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 G.

 

Fire on the ground. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

Wildlife Biologist Ben Robinson sets a fire. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

One member of the crew shares their fire with another. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

Wildlife Biologist Wes Little checks the fire he initiated in a switchgrass field at Shaker Village. Switchgrass goes up in pretty spectacular fashion...part of the reason why it is used in biofuels. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

Wildlife biologist Terri Estes grimaces after finding out John Morgan ate all her Ding Dongs! Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

With all of her Ding Dongs gone, she had to switch to Fudge Rounds. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 24mm f/1.4.

 

Chris Grasch heading across the landscape with strong heat distortion from the fire right behind him. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

More creation of strip head fires. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

 

Filling drip-torches. The drip torches use a combination of gasoline and diesel fule to initiate fires. Nikon D7000 with AFS Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.
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